Education & Entrepreneurship

 

Education & Entrepreneurship

entrepreneurship-education
 
 

Entrepreneurship is a rapidly-evolving field, and is a buzz-word amongst employers worldwide. More and more universities are incorporating entrepreneurship into their higher education—not just in business studies, but also in science, engineering, finance and the arts.

Why teach entrepreneurship?

There’s a romantic notion of the entrepreneur who creates the next Facebook and becomes a multi-billionaire, but what about the countless examples of entrepreneurial skills helping out in any career? Skills like resilience, focusing on goals, seeking opportunity, independence, collaboration, continuous learning, and selling a product, idea, or vision, to name but a few.

A major part of our mission to advance work as a force for good is empowering people through soft-skills to have more control over their careers. And since entrepreneurship and intrapreneurship—entrepreneurship applied to one’s role within a company—combine soft skills critical for anyone seeking more opportunities, agency and job satisfaction, we decided it was the ideal place to start.

We were prompted to create workshops for students after asking ourselves some of the questions below:

  • How might a student's understanding of entrepreneurship help them make more-informed decisions about higher education and their career?
  • How might parents be reassured by their children making choices informed by the modern world of work?

  • How might entrepreneurial training make for a smoother transition between education and employment?

  • How might entrepreneurial awareness amongst students help Mauritius play a key part in the industries of tomorrow?

Giving students the awareness and tools to see a problem and think about out how to solve it empowers them to view the world as not just a hazy post-university destination, but as an environment which they can impact and improve upon.

Entrepreneurial skills at school

Soft skills are highly-sought by recruiters and university admissions, but are not always easy to develop. They often come from extra-curricular activities, hobbies, sports. Many schools are redesigning their curricula to better incorporate soft skills within their core teaching, and it is through this kind of integration and practical application that the skills necessary for the modern employee or entrepreneur begin to emerge.

The subject of entrepreneurship leads itself naturally to experience-based learning: practical exercises and extra-curricular activities can provide students direction based not only on aspiration but on real life experience. Giving students the awareness and tools to see a problem and think about out how to solve it empowers them to view the world as not just a hazy post-university destination, but as an environment which they can impact and improve upon. This is how future change-makers are born.

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Why wait until graduation?

Soft skills such as problem solving, leadership, adaptability and team-work are crucial components of a forward-looking curriculum: they are essential to success in the modern working world. Entrepreneurship training is a vehicle of these skills.

Psychology Today writes that "creative problem solving skills, leadership abilities, experience working on effective teams, and adaptability in an ever-changing environment” are indispensable life skills, whether students go on to work for someone or to start a business. They are highly sought by both university admissions and graduate employers: exposure to the world of starting and running a business is a competitive advantage when applying for scholarships and jobs. That's why we believe there's no better time to start teaching entrepreneurial skills than in school.

The goal of our workshops for education is to support the modern, forward-looking institutions which recognise the importance of entrepreneurial skills to help students achieve more in their careers.